Agreement On Trade-Related Aspects Of Intellectual Property Rights Citation

Article 10 of the agreement states that “1. Computer programs, whether in the source code or in the object code, must be protected as literary works under the Berne Convention (1971). (2) The compilation of data or any other material, whether machine-readable or in any other form, constituting spiritual creations because of the choice or disposition of their content, must be protected as such. Such protection, which does not cover the data or material itself, does not affect the copyrights that exist in the data or materials themselves. If you know the missing items that are using them, you can help us create those links by adding the corresponding references in the same way as above for each reference item. If you are a registered author of this article, you can also check the “Quotes” tab in your RePEc Author service profile, as some quotes may wait for confirmation. Daniele Archibugi and Andrea Filippetti[34] argue that the importance of TRIPS in the process of developing and disseminating knowledge and innovation has been overestimated by its supporters. This was supported by the FINDINGs of the United Nations that many low-protection countries regularly benefit from significant foreign direct investment (FDI). [35] Analysis of OECD countries in the 1980s and 1990s (which extended the lifespan of drug patents by 6 years) showed that, although the total number of registered products increased slightly, the average innovation index remained unchanged. [36] On the other hand, J-rg Baten, Nicola Bianchi and Petra Moser (2017)[37] find historical evidence that compulsory licensing – a key mechanism for weakening IP rights under Article 31 of TRIPS – can effectively lead to the promotion of inventions by increasing the threat to competition in areas of low competition.

They argue, however, that the benefits of weakening intellectual property rights depend heavily on the ability of governments to make a credible commitment to use them only in exceptional cases, since companies can invest less in research and development if they expect repeated episodes of mandatory licensing. the agreement on trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights (Annex 1C of the World Trade Organization agreement of 15 April 1994); See secretariat of the Agreement, the results of the multilateral trade negotiations of the Uruguay Round, texts 365 and following (1994), www.wto.org/english/docs_e/legal_e/legal_e.htm#wtoagreement (delivered on 25 November 2003). Trips-plus conditions, which impose standards beyond TRIPS, have also been verified. [38] These free trade agreements contain conditions that limit the ability of governments to introduce competition for generic drug manufacturers.